last.fm

The Teardrop Explodes – Ha Ha I'm Drowning

http://www.last.fm/music/The+Teardrop+Explodes
last.fm

Björk – Unison

http://www.last.fm/music/Bj%C3%B6rk
last.fm

Björk – Harm of Will

http://www.last.fm/music/Bj%C3%B6rk
last.fm

Björk – Heirloom

http://www.last.fm/music/Bj%C3%B6rk
last.fm

Björk – Sun in My Mouth

http://www.last.fm/music/Bj%C3%B6rk
twitter

"Flash is dead, and YouTube dealt the killing blow" http://t.co/ASuQmdkKky If this proves to be true then @YouTube have my eternal thanks!

books read

Penetration Testing with Perl

Penetration Testing with Perl
author: Douglas Berdeaux
name: David
average rating: 0.0
book published: 2014
rating: 0
read at:
date added: 2015/01/30
shelves: currently-reading
review:

twitter

@bigdaddymerk I'd *really* like to see @Misskeeleyhawes turn up in it too.

twitter

@bigdaddymerk Hoping that a) he makes an appearance and b) they keep it as a surprise.

twitter

SPOOKS FILM TEASER TRAILER KLAXON!! - http://t.co/mObWKxWBHY (thanks for @bigdaddymerk for the heads-up)

twitter

Saw Julian Cope (@HeadHeritage) last night. All most enjoyable. Highly recommended.

github

davorg pushed to gh-pages at davorg/twittelection

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/twittelection

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/twittelection

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/twittelection

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to gh-pages at davorg/twittelection

Dave Cross
books read

jQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition - New Kicks and Tricks

jQuery: Novice to Ninja, 2nd Edition - New Kicks and Tricks
author: Craig Sharkie
name: David
average rating: 4.09
book published: 2012
rating: 0
read at:
date added: 2015/01/26
shelves: currently-reading
review:

perl hacks

London Perl Jobs Mailing List

London.pm is undergoing one of its periodic reorganisations. We’re in the process of moving our web site over to a new server and as part of that move, we’ve decided that we’ll move our mailing list infrastructure to a third party system. Both the main discussion list and the announcements list will be run on Sympa.

But that’s not all the lists we currently have. In particular, we had a London Perl Jobs list, which anyone could use to post details of Perl jobs in London. It’s been decided that this list is too much hassle to keep up. Apparently, it needs a pretty high level of work from moderators. So that list isn’t going to be migrated and it will quietly die.

I thought that was a bit of a shame. I think it’s a useful list. And, in particular, I think it would be easy for outsiders to misread the reasons for the closure – given the current discussions about the death of Perl. Perhaps the list was killed off because there are no longer any Perl jobs in London (you and I both know that’s not true, but not everyone is following the situation as closely as we are).

So I decided to do something about it. I just happened to have a useful-looking domain sitting around not doing very much, so I’ve set up a jobs mailing list over there. Feel free to subscribe if you’re interested in Perl jobs in London. And, more importantly, please encourage people who are looking for Perl programmers in London to post their jobs to jobs@londonperl.co.uk.

Currently, the list is configured like this:

I’ll be happy to reconsider any of those settings once the list has been running for a while. I’m also considering setting up an associated jobs discussion list, if people think that would be useful.

See you on the mailing list.

The post London Perl Jobs Mailing List appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

Slideshare Stats

For many years (since the end of 2007, apparently) I’ve been uploading the slides from my talks and training courses to Slideshare.

This morning I got an email from them, telling me that they had made their analytics pages freely available. I don’t know if this is a permanent change or a special offer, but the link (which will only work for logged in users) is http://www.slideshare.net/insight.

There’s a lot of information there and I look forward into digging into it in a lot more detail. But I thought it would be interesting to share the list of my top ten most popular slide decks.

Title Views
Introduction to Perl – Day 1 71722
LPW: Beginners Perl 50935
Modern Web Development with Perl 33034
Modern Perl for Non-Perl Programmers 27376
Matt’s PSGI Archive 24341
Introduction to Web Programming with Perl 22544
Introduction to Perl – Day 2 20489
Introduction to Modern Perl 17709
Introducing Modern Perl 13871
Modern Core Perl 11337

A lot of those course are aimed at people who are starting Perl from scratch. I guess it’s true that there are plenty of people out there who still want to learn Perl.

The post Slideshare Stats appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

Dev Assistant

A couple of days ago, I updated to my laptop to Fedora 21. One of the new features was an application called DevAssistant which claimed that:

It does not matter if you only recently discovered the world of software development, or if you have been coding for two decades, there’s always something DevAssistant can do to make your life easier.

I thought it was worth investigating – particularly when I saw that it had support for Perl.

Starting the GUI and pressing the Perl button gives me two options: “Basic Class” and “Dancer”. I chose the “Basic Class” option. That gave me an dialogue box where I could give my new project a name. I chose “MyClass” (it’s only an example!) This created a directory called MyClass in my home directory and put two files in that directory. Here are the contents of those two files.

main.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

#use strict;
use warnings;

use POSIX qw(strftime);

use myClass;

my $myClass = new myClass( "Holiday", "Baker Street", "Sherlock Holmes");
my $tm = strftime "%m/%d/%Y", localtime;
$myClass->enterBookedDate($tm);

print ("The hotel name is ". $myClass->getHotelName() . "\n");
print ("The hotel street is ". $myClass->getStreet() . "\n");
print ("The hotel is booked on the name ". $myClass->getGuestName() . "\n");
print ("Accomodation starts at " . $myClass->getBookedDate() . "\n");

myClass.pm

package myClass;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = {
        _hotelName => shift,
        _street => shift,
        _name => shift,
        _date => undef
    };
    bless $self, $class;
    return $self;
}

sub enterBookedDate {
    my ($self) = shift;
    my $date = shift;
    $self->{_date} = $date;
}

sub getHotelName {
    my $self = shift;
    return $self->{_hotelName};
}

sub getStreet {
    my $self = shift;
    return $self->{_street};
}

sub getGuestName {
    my $self = shift;
    return $self->{_name};
}

sub getBookedDate {
    my $self = shift;
    return $self->{_date};
}

1;

It’s great, of course, that the project wants to support Perl. I think that we should do everything we can to help them. But it’s clear to me that they don’t have anyone on the team who knows anything about modern Perl practices.

So who wants to volunteer to help them?

Update: So it turns out that the dev team are really responsive to pull requests :-)

The post Dev Assistant appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

Perl Recruitment Thoughts

Not many weeks go by when I don’t hear of another Perl-using company that has been evaluating alternative technologies. In most cases, it’s not because they think that Perl is a bad language to use. The most common reason I hear is that it is becoming harder and harder to find good Perl programmers.

On Quora I recently saw a question asking what job opportunities were like for Perl programmers. This is how I answered:

Right now is a good time to be a Perl programmer. Perl is losing mindshare. Very few new Perl programmers are arriving on the scene and quite a lot of former Perl programmers have moved away from the language to what they see as more lucrative, enjoyable or saleable languages.

But there are still a lot of companies with a lot of Perl code. That all needs to be maintained and enhanced. And many of those companies continue to write new projects in Perl too.

All of which means that it’s a seller’s market for good Perl skills. That won’t last forever, of course. To be honest, I’d be surprised if it lasts for more than five or ten years (well, unless Perl 6 takes off quickly). But it’ll do me for the next few years at least.

I’m putting a positive spin on it, but it’s getting to be a real problem. More programmers abandon Perl, that makes it harder to find good Perl programmers, which makes it more likely that companies will abandon Perl, which leads to fewer Perl jobs and more programmers decide to abandon Perl. It’s a vicious circle.

I’m not sure how we get to the root of that problem, but do have some suggestions for on particular area. A client recently asked my for suggestions on how they can improve their hit rate for recruiting good Perl programmers. My suggestions all revolved about making your company better known in the Perl community (because that’s where many of the better Perl programmers are).

I know that many of the Perl-using companies already know this. But in the interests of levelling the playing field, I thought was worth sharing some of my suggestions.

Perl Mongers Social Meetings

Do you have a local Perl Mongers group? If so, they almost certainly have monthly social meetings. And in many cases they will welcome a company that puts a few quid behind the bar for drinks at one of those meetings. For smaller groups (and there are many smaller groups) you might even offer to buy them dinner.

It’s worth contacting them before doing this. Just turning up and flashing your money around might be seen as rude. And some groups might object to this kind of commercialisation. But it’s always worth asking.

Perl Mongers Technical Meeting

Some Perl Mongers groups have technical meetings (either instead of or as well as social meetings). In this case, instead of meeting in a pub (or bar or restaurant), they’ll meet in the offices of a friendly local company and some of the members will give presentations to the group. Many groups struggle to find venues for these kinds of meetings. Why not offer your office? And perhaps throw in some pizza and beer.

Perl Workshop

The next step up from technical meetings is Perl workshops. Many Perl Mongers groups organise annual one-day workshops. There can be many talks taking place across a number of tracks over the course of (usually) a day. The organisers often like to make these events free (mainly, it seems, because charging for stuff like this adds a whole new layer of complexity). But it’s not free to put on these events so they rely heavily on sponsors. Can you help pay for the venue? Or the printing? Or the catering? Different events will have different opportunities available. Contact the organisers.

YAPC

Workshops are national and (usually) one-day events. YAPC are international conferences that span many days. They have all the same requirements, but bigger. So they need more money. And, of course, sponsors can be at the conference telling potential employees just how wonderful it is to work for them.

The Perl Foundation

The Perl Foundation are the organisation that promotes Perl, holds various Perl trademarks and hosts many Perl web sites. They issue grants for people to work on various Perl-related projects. They never have enough money. They love companies who donate money to them as thanks for the benefit that Perl brings. How much you donate is up to you, but as a guide, most announcements seem to be in the $10,000 range.

In each of these cases, the idea is really to show the Perl community how much you value Perl by helping various Perl organisations to organise events that raise people’s awareness of Perl. Everyone wins. The sponsors get seen as good people to work for and the events themselves demonstrate that modern Perl is still a great language.

So the next time someone in your company asks how they can find good Perl people, consider a different approach. Can you embed your company in the conciousness of the Perl community and make yourselves look more attractive to some of the best Perl programmers in the world?

The post Perl Recruitment Thoughts appeared first on Perl Hacks.

cpan

Tie-Hash-Cannabinol-1.11

=êå{^žÈ¨ú+r·š¶)à…«!zËaj×è®­¶§‚
perl hacks

LPW & Perl Web Book

Return to the Kingdom of the Blind from Dave Cross

Last Saturday was the London Perl Workshop. As always, it was a great day with a fabulous selection of talks. As always, I’m desperately waiting for the videos to appear so that I can see the talks that I was forced to miss because of clashes.

I spoke a couple of times. In the morning I ran a two-hour training course entitled “Perl in the Internet of Things”. The slides are up on Slideshare.

And, towards the end of the day I gave a lightning talk called “Return to the Kingdom of the Blind. It was a sequel to the similarly-named lightning talk I gave a couple of times last year. This year I particularly concentrated on the fact that so many people seem to cling to the idea of using CGI to write web applications when there are so many better technologies available.

I decided that part of the problem is that there are no modern Perl web development books and people are still picking up books that are fifteen years old. At the end of the talk I announced that I was planning to put that right and that I was planning to write a new book on Perl web development that would be available in time for the next London Perl Workshop.

The project has a web site, a Github repo and a Twitter feed. I hope that things will start to happen over the next couple of weeks.

Wish me luck.

The post LPW & Perl Web Book appeared first on Perl Hacks.

slideshare

Perl in the Internet of Things


My training course from the 2014 London Perl Workshop
slideshare

Return to the Kingdom of the Blind


A talk from the London Perl Workshop 2014
cpan

Array-Compare-2.11

=êå{^žÈ¨ú+r‰©j¸§ªëk+
cpan

Array-Compare-2.10

=êå{^žÈ¨ú+r‰©j¸§ªëk+
cpan

WWW-Shorten-3.06

"{^­öœzÚD»!¢»^ž)à²+^
slideshare

Github, Travis-CI and Perl


A quick introduction to using Github and Travis-CI to test Perl projects
slideshare

Object-Oriented Programming with Perl and Moose


sources

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