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Sponsored: 64% off Code Black Drone with HD Camera

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twitter

Still on Romanian time. My stomach is shouting "why the hell haven't we had lunch yet?!"

twitter

@griffinkate Oh, yes. That's right. Damn, sometimes I hate living in the UK.

twitter

@griffinkate But I think the point is to stop any new advances and to reverse some of the BBC existing ones.

twitter

@griffinkate Isn't it illegal for market stalls to use pounds and ounces? I know milk (and beer) have alleviation exceptions.

twitter

Here's a Brexit side-effect that I didn't foresee. Idiots want to bring back imperial measurements :-( https://t.co/imT9meQhgV

perl hacks

DamianWare

Yesterday at YAPC Europe I gave a talk called “Error(s) Free Programming”. The slides are below, but it might make more sense once the video is online.

Error(s) Free Programming from Dave Cross

The talk is about Damian Conway’s module Lingua::EN::Inflexion and how it makes programmers’ lives easier. As part of the talk, I invented a logo for the fictional DamianWare brand. DamianWare is, of course, a brand that specialises in using deep Perl magic in order to produce tools that help Perl programmers be lazier.

It was just a joke. A throwaway visual to make a point in the presentation. But after the talk Mallory approached me and suggested that the logo would look great on a t-shirt which was sold to benefit The Perl Foundation. I couldn’t really argue with that.

And, having emailed him overnight, it turns out that Damian agrees it’s a good idea too.

So the shirts (and a couple of other things) are now available on Spreadshirt (currently the UK version, I’ll try to make them more widely available as soon as possible).

There’s an easier to remember URL at http://perlhacks.com/damian.

Any profit that I make (and I think it’s about 20% of the sale price) will be donated to TPF as soon as I receive it.

The post DamianWare appeared first on Perl Hacks.

slideshare

Error(s) Free Programming


A talk about writing better messages in Perl. Presented at YAPC Europe in Cluj-Napoca, Romania in 2016.
perl hacks

Cultured Perl

Back in about 2008, I set up a group blog called “Cultured Perl”. The idea was to have a blog that concentrated on the Perl community rather than the technical aspects that most Perl bloggers write about most of the time. It didn’t last very long though and after a few posts it quietly died. But the name “Cultured Perl” still appeals to my love of bad puns and I knew I would reuse it at some point.

At YAPC Europe 2010 in Pisa, I gave a lightning talk called Perl Vogue. It talked about the way the Perl modules come into fashion and often go out of fashion again very quickly. I suggested an online Perl magazine which would tell people which modules were fashionable each month. It was a joke, of course (not least because Vogue are famously defensive of their brand.

Over the last many years people have suggested that the Perl community needs to get “out of the echo chamber” and talk to people who aren’t part of the community. For example, instead of posting and answering Perl questions on a Perl-specific web site like Perl Monks, it’s better to do it on a general programming site like Stack Overflow.

Hold those three thoughts. “Cultured Perl”, online Perl magazine, getting out of the echo chamber.

Medium is a very popular blogging site. Many people have moved their blogging there and it’s a great community for writing, sharing and recommending long-form writing. I get a “recommended reading” email from Medium every day and it always contains links to several interesting articles.

Medium has two other features that interest me. Firstly, you can tag posts. So if you write a post about web development using Perl and tag it with “web dev” then it will be seen by anyone who is following the web dev tag. That’s breaking out of the echo chamber.

Secondly, Medium has “publications”. That is, you can bring a set of articles together under your own banner. Publication owners can style their front page in various ways to differentiate it from Medium’s default styling. Readers can subscribe to publications and they will then be notified of every article published in that publication. That’s an online magazine.

So I’ve set up a publication on Medium (called “Cultured Perl” – to complete the set of three ideas). My plan is to publish (or republish) top quality Perl articles so we slowly build a brand outside of the echo chamber where people know they can find all that is best in Perl writing.

If you write about Perl, please consider signing up to Medium, becoming a contributor to Cultured Perl and submitting your articles for publication. I’ll publish the best ones (and, hopefully, work with authors to improve the others so they are good enough to publish).

I’m happy to republish stuff from your other blogs. I’m not suggesting that we suddenly move all Perl blogging to Medium. For example, whenever I publish something on Perl Hacks, the post gets mirrored to a Perl Hacks publication that I set up on Medium earlier this year. There’s a WordPress to Medium plugin that does that automatically for me. There may well be similar tools for other blogging platforms (if you can’t find one for your blog – then Medium has an API so you could  write one).

If you are a reader, then please consider subscribing to Cultured Perl. And please recommend (by clicking on the heart symbol) any articles that you enjoy. The more recommendations that an article gets, the more likely it becomes that Medium will recommend it to other readers.

I have no idea how this will go, but over the next few months I hope to start by publishing four or five articles every week. Perhaps you could start by submitting articles about what a great time you had at YAPC Europe.

Oh, and here are the slides from the lightning talk I used to announce this project at YAPC Europe in Cluj-Napoca, Romania yesterday.

Medium Perl from Dave Cross

 

The post Cultured Perl appeared first on Perl Hacks.

slideshare

Medium Perl


In which I describe my plan for a new Perl online magazine. A lightning talk from Yapc Europe 2016 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
flickr

I need to get round to giving this a title

Dave Cross posted a photo:

I need to get round to giving this a title

New photo added to gallery via Android ift.tt/2bLW5Cz

flickr

I need to get round to giving this a title

Dave Cross posted a photo:

I need to get round to giving this a title

New photo added to gallery via Android ift.tt/2bzRVRC

books read

Concretopia: A Journey Around the Rebuilding of Postwar Britain

Concretopia: A Journey Around the Rebuilding of Postwar Britain
author: John Grindrod
name: David
average rating: 4.25
book published: 2013
rating: 0
read at:
date added: 2016/08/17
shelves: currently-reading
review:

flickr

The Magnetic North at RIBA

Dave Cross posted a photo:

The Magnetic North at RIBA

New photo added to gallery via Android ift.tt/2aIDFk4

flickr

Rugby School

Dave Cross posted a photo:

Rugby School

New photo added to gallery via Android ift.tt/2aJU9LY

flickr

William Webb Ellis

Dave Cross posted a photo:

William Webb Ellis

New photo added to gallery via Android ift.tt/2aK9Z83

perl hacks

Intended Audience

I thought I’d pretty much finished blogging about my upcoming Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer training course. But a couple of days ago I saw a tweet that reminded me about an aspect that I’d completely forgotten.

And he’s right, of course. I haven’t mentioned that at all. Let’s put that right.

As it happens, yesterday I pretty much finished writing the slides for the course. So that means that I know what I’ll be covering and, therefore, what the attendees will need to know.

What You’ll Need To Know

To start with, I need to make it clear that this is not a “beginning Perl” course. There’s a lot of new topics to cover and if Perl itself was on the list then it would need to be a two or three day course.

So you’ll need to know Perl. But to what level?

If you’ve read Intermediate Perl then you’ll be fine. That means you’ll need to understand how to use modules, packages and references. Probably the most advanced Perl concept we’ll need is subroutine references. But, to be honest, if you’re not completely comfortable with them, that won’t be a problem.

You’ll need to know a bit about how web pages are made – so a little bit of HTML and CSS. We’ll be using Bootstrap to deal with most of our CSS, so you won’t need to do anything at all complicated with CSS. If you understand the difference between a class and an id in CSS terms then you’ll be fine.

We’ll be using quite a lot of Javascript – specifically jQuery with Mustache. I’m no Javascript expert, so it’s likely that many of the people in the class will know more than me. If you’ve never used jQuery, then I recommend that you spend a couple of hours looking into it before coming to the class. You don’t need to know anything about Mustache before the course.

There will be a database at the back-end of the app. I’ll be running MySQL (actually, probably MariaDB), but any of the popular database systems will work – just as long as Perl’s DBI supports it. I’ll supply SQL to set up the database and insert some test data and we’ll be using DBIx::Class which will remove the need to know any SQL. But it would be good if you were familiar with whatever database system you’re using – to the extent that you can run queries against your local database.

What You’ll Need to Bring

You’ll need a laptop. I’m assuming that we’ll have access to WiFi at the training venue, but it would be great if you could install as much as possible of the required software before the day – just so we save a bit of time.

My laptop runs Windows 10, but I do all of my development in a virtual machine running Fedora 24. I’m happy for you to work in Windows or OSX, but the level of support I can provide for people not running Linux will be limited.

You’ll need Perl installed. Linux and OSX will already have a version of Perl installed. For Windows users, I recommend Strawberry Perl. Get the most recent version of Perl that you can install. The current version is 5.24. I think my laptop has 5.22. Anything  earlier than 5.10 is unlikely to be particularly useful.

You’ll need some CPAN modules installed. These are all pretty common modules:

You’ll need a database server installed on your laptop. As I mentioned above, any of the popular database engines will work – but I’ll be using MariaDB. Make sure that you know how to start the database server and connect to it using a command line program.

You’ll need a Git client so that you can clone the Git repository that contains the source code for the course. You’ll want to ensure the the repository is cloned to your laptop before turning up to the course. You might even want to glance through some of the code to get a head-start on the rest of the attendees.

You can find the course code at

The CSS and Javascript libraries are all included in the Git repository.

I think that’s about all you need to know. Please let me know if you have any further questions.

I’ve been really pleased with the reaction to this course. We already have a large number of people signed up. So many, in fact, that I need to start thinking about the number of people I have room for. I think we can get another five (perhaps ten) people in. So if you’re thinking of signing up, please do it soon to avoid disappointment (trainers say stuff like this for every course – but this time it’s really true).

Hope to see some of you in Cluj-Napoca.

The post Intended Audience appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer2

Here are some more details of the Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer2 course that I’ll be running in Cluj-Napoca on the day before YAPC Europe.

The course runs a full day (that’s six hours – in four 90-minute sessions with breaks in between). It’s a hands-on course – you’ll need to bring a laptop and closer to the time I’ll email attendees with details of the software they will need to have installed. Like all of the pre-conference training, the course will take place at Cluj Hub on Tuesday 23rd August.

Over the course of twelve steps, we’ll build a simple Todo list program. We’ll be using a number of modern web development techniques (not just Perl) in order to make the app look really shiny and modern.

The twelve steps we will be taking are as follows:

  1. Set up a basic Dancer2 app
  2. Make it look nicer with the addition of the Bootstrap CSS framework
  3. Use Plack Middleware to serve static content more efficiently
  4. Display some data in our app
  5. Get the data from a database
  6. Return the data as JSON and display it using Mustache
  7. Use jQuery to show/hide completed items
  8. Mark items as completed
  9. Add new tasks to the app
  10. Add user login
  11. Edit and delete tasks
  12. Add tags to tasks and filter the display on those tags

If there’s time left at the end, we’ll discuss other useful enhancements that we might want to make to the app – and perhaps even try adding them.

We’ll be using the following Perl tools:

And the following non-Perl tools:

Usually, a course like this would cost around £300. But because it’s at YAPC and the sponsors are so generous, we can offer it for the heavily discounted price of 100€.

Cluj Hub sounds like a fabulous venue for the training courses and I’m sure that the day will be a lot of fun. Perhaps more importantly, I’m also sure that attendees will come away with some useful skills to add to their CVs.

Tickets are on sale now. Please buy quickly – before they sell out.

The post Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer2 appeared first on Perl Hacks.

cpan

Ogg-Vorbis-Header-0.05

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perl hacks

Updating Ogg::Vorbis::Header

Last night, I uploaded a new version of Ogg::Vorbis::Header – a CPAN module that hasn’t been updated since 2003 and which I strongly suspect no-one at all uses any more. You might be interested to hear what I did or why I did it.

About a year ago, I wrote about the dashboard I had written for my CPAN modules. It’s a simple page that pulls together information about all of my modules and, among other things, shows me how they are doing on Travis CI and Coveralls.

One of the aims of the dashboard was to encourage me to do more work ensuring that my CPAN modules were working well and had good test coverage. The idea was that if I’m constantly looking at a page which shows how rubbish the test coverage for a module is, then I’ll be more motivated to fix it. Of course, that only works if I’m constantly looking at the dashboard and, to be honest, over the year since I built it I really haven’t taken much notice of it.

But recently, I was reminded of its existence as I updated it to remove some modules that I’ve handed over to other people and to add a couple of new modules I had released. And, in doing that, I took a closer look at it and my attention was drawn to AudioFile::Info::Ogg::Vorbis::Header. This is the only one of my modules which doesn’t even build on Travis. Clearly, more investigation was needed. But, before we get into that, it’s probably worth making a brief digression to explain what the module does.

Some of you will be too young to remember this, but there was a time back in the early middle ages of internet history (so, perhaps, fifteen years ago) when not everyone listened to music as MP3s. Back then, one of the biggest sources of digital music for many people was ripping their existing CDs (ask your parents – they might still have a CD or two they can show you). And when ripping music from CDs we had a choice of formats. Most people (even then) were using MP3, but some of us took the ideologically superior option of ripping to Ogg Vorbis. The main reason was that MP3 format was patented, but Ogg Vorbis was completely free.

All of this meant that in the first five or six years of the 21st century, I ended up with hundreds (maybe thousands) of Ogg Vorbis files on my hard disk. This immediately gave me problems as it dramatically limited the devices that I could play my music on. For example, it probably explains why I’ve never owned an iPod.

But I also… er… acquired a number of MP3s over the same time. And, being a geek, at times I wanted to write programs that gathered information about all of my music, no matter what format it was stored in. There were modules on CPAN for dealing with MP3s and there were modules on CPAN for dealing with Ogg Vorbis files. But (as is so often the way with these things) all of these modules worked in completely different ways.

And that’s I wrote the AudioFile::Info set of modules. They acted as a wrapper around the various modules for dealing with the different audio formats and gave them all the same interface. It meant that I could write programs that got information from any of my audio files and I didn’t need to care what format they were in. Think of them a bit like a DBI for audio file formats.

Of course, no-one else ever had any use for them. And soon afterwards MP3 became the de-facto standard for digital audio and Ogg Vorbis was relegated to the same (virtual) drawer as Betamax. I’d say that no-one uses it any more – but I suspect there are actually about eight users left and they would all write comments telling me that I was wrong.

None of the AudioFile::Info modules have been updated for a very long time, because no-one uses them any more and no-one cares about them. I’d remove them from CPAN, but that goes against my pack-rat nature.

All of which leaves me annoyed by the failure of AudioFile::Info::Ogg::Vorbis::Header to build on Travis. So a couple of weeks ago, I investigated further. And, to my delight, I found that it wasn’t my fault. Actually, it was the underlying module (Ogg::Vorbis::Header) that had the problem. That module no longer built successfully on modern Perls. And that failure prevented my module from building on top of it.

The problem is described in this RT ticket. Basically, there was some very funky syntax in a test. Syntax that became a fatal error through some parser fixes in Perl 5.22. The test looked like this:

ok(@{$ogg->comment("artist")}->[0] == "Dan");

When it should have looked like this:

ok(($ogg->comment("artist"))[0] eq "Dan");

In the RT ticket, H. Merijn Brand gives a good explanation of how the test ever passed – but try working it out for yourself before looking.

So, anyway, I knew what the problem was and I knew how to fix it. My next step was to pass this information on to the author of the module. I emailed him a couple of weeks ago, offering to make the fixes myself if he was too busy (or too uninterested) to do it himself. I got no reply, so at the end of last week I emailed the CPAN Powers That Be explaining the situation and asking for co-maintenance rights on the module so that I could fix the problem. They granted my request – which is why the new version was released yesterday. I can already see that the tests for this version look a lot healthier than the ones for the previous version.

Healthier, but still not as healthy as I’d like them. Within an hour or so of my release hitting CPAN, this issue was raised. The Makefile.PL uses Inline::MakeMaker and I can’t work out how to make that work, given that the “use” statement is executed long before any of the configuration code that tells the build tools what modules are required. If you have any suggestions, please let me know (or send me a pull request). I’m a bit out of my depth when it comes to Inline-based modules.

There are a few other things that I might fix. It’s an old-style distribution where there are no /lib or /t directories. It’s all in the top-level directory. I’m very tempted to move all that stuff around.

But really, I should get back to ensuring that my module builds successfully now.

Update: On Sunday, I released another version of Ogg::Vorbis::Header which fixed the packaging problems. But it still hasn’t solved my Travis-CI woes and there are still a disappointing number of failures on CPAN testers (actually they are “unknown” results rather than real failures – because there are still cases where the module won’t even build).

The problem is the underlying C libraries. Ogg::Vorbis::Header relies on the libogg and libvorbis libraries. And a large number of people aren’t going to have those libraries installed (the Travis-CI environment certainly doesn’t). Trying to build the module on a system that doesn’t have those libraries is doomed to failure.

The solution is, I suspect, to build Alien modules for these two libraries. But that’s something that I know very little about. I doubt I’ll have the time to learn a whole new area of CPAN packaging until after YAPC Europe at the earliest. Of course, if some kind person who knows more about this area than me was to offer to help (or even to produce the Alien modules for me) then that would make me very happy 🙂

The post Updating Ogg::Vorbis::Header appeared first on Perl Hacks.

davblog

Brexit

I was awake soon after 5:30 yesterday morning. As I got to my computer, the EU referendum results weren’t confirmed, but it was looking certain that the country had voted (narrowly, but decisively) to leave the European Union. My thoughts during the day are nicely summed up by my tweets and retweets.

My initial reaction was anger.

(Hmm… the downside of rolling news coverage – that story has changed dramatically since I first linked to it.)

A few minutes later I was slightly more coherent (and almost philosophical)

Then the reality of the situation started to sink in

I tried to be positive

I was being sarcastic, of course. We’ll return to this subject later on.

I started to see life imitating art in a quite frightening way.

(And, yes, I know I should replace that picture with one of Boris Johnson)

Nigel Farage is (and, apparently, always has been) a despicable man. So it should have come as no surprise that his victory speech was insulting and divisive.

I don’t mind not being considered ordinary, but I’m certain I’m real and I like to think I’m decent. Tom Coates inverted Farage’s phrase nicely.

When Cameron resigned, I immediately became worried about the fall-out.

Really, if your best option is a man who stuck his penis into a pig’s mouth, then it must be clear that you’re in trouble.

Then I checked the stock market and realised that many of the Brexit supporters may have shot themselves in the foot.

A story in the FT illustrated the fall nicely (“nicely” isn’t really the right word!)

The markets bounced back a bit later in the day – but it was one of the most volatile days of trading in history.

Fox News can, of course, always be relied on to get important facts wrong.

Then I started to see data on the demographics of the voting – where it became obvious that it was mainly the older generations who were voting against the EU

Can I just point out that it’s #NotAllBabyBoomers :-/

Remember the £350m a week that was going to be diverted to the NHS. Turns out that was a lie.

It was a lie on many fronts.

It was a lie that the Leave campaign were called out on many times, but they refused to retract it.

To be fair to Farage (and that’s not a phrase I ever expected to write) he wasn’t part of the official Leave campaign, so he wasn’t the right person to ask about this. But someone should certainly take Johnson or Gove to task over it.

Going back to the baby-boomers, I retweeted a friend’s innocent question

Then it started to look like Cameron might not be the only party leader to go in the fallout from the referendum

Incidentally, has anyone seen any evidence of the Lib Dems in this campaign? A couple of days ago I saw footage of Tim Farron in a crowd somewhere. Took me a few seconds to remember who he was; and then another minute or so to remember that he was the leader of the Lib Dems.

Euro-myths have always really annoyed me

More bad news from the City

I should point out that Morgan Stanley have denied the story. I guess time will tell who is telling the truth here.

By mid-afternoon, I was working on alternative plans

A final thought struck me

I mean, they were a single-issue party. And they’ve won that battle. Surely, there’s no need for the party to exist any longer. They can’t surely expect people to vote for them now (although, UK voters are a very strange bunch). If they closed down, they could all go back to the Tories and Farage and Carswell could get places in the new Johnson/Gove cabinet.

Oh, now I’m really depressed.

The post Brexit appeared first on Davblog.

cpan

Net-Songkick-v1.0.2

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cpan

Net-Songkick-v1.0.1

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cpan

Array-Compare-2.12

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cpan

QMail-QueueHandler-2.0.2

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davblog

Ten Years?

It’s been some considerable time since I wrote anything about Nadine Dorries. I still keep an eye on what she’s up to, but most of the time it’s just the same old nonsense and it’s not worth writing about.

But I was interested to read her recent blog post explaining why she had given up Twitter (again). Of course, she uses it to rehash many of her old claims of stalking and the like, but what I found really interesting was when she said:

After almost ten years on Twitter (so long I can’t remember) and with 28,000 followers, I have made my own modest exit.

Because that “almost ten years” didn’t fit my recollections. Twitter has just had its tenth anniversary. As I wrote recently, almost no-one has been on Twitter for ten years – certainly not any British MPs.

It’s simple enough to use one of the many “how long have I been on Twitter?” sites to work out when her current @NadineDorriesMP account joined Twitter. It seems to be January 2012.

But that’s not the full story. She has joined and left Twitter a few times. Let’s see what we can find out.

Firstly, here’s a blog post from May 2009 where she doesn’t seem to be planning to join Twitter any time soon.

Anyway, safe to say, I shan’t be joining the legions of twitters any day soon.

It’s several months later, in September 2009, when she announces that she has joined Twitter. So that “ten years” is more like six and a half.

I’m pretty sure that first account was also called @NadineDorriesMP. At some point over the next couple of years, she closed that account (I’ll dig through her blog later to see if I can find any evidence to date that) and some time later she returned with a new account called @Nadine_MP. I know that because in May 2011 she gave up that second account and forgot to remove the Twitter widget from her web site. Then someone else took over the now-abandoned username and used it to deface her site. And then, as we saw above, she rejoined in January 2012.

So I think the list of Nadine’s Twitter accounts goes like this:

That last account is still registered. She just chooses not to use it any more. If past behaviour is anything to go by, she’ll be back at some point.

Anyway, here’s another good example of why you can’t trust anything that Dorries says. Even on a simple fact like how long she has been using Twitter, she just pulls numbers out of the air. She makes stuff up to suit her and she’s been doing it for years.

The post Ten Years? appeared first on Davblog.

davblog

Twitter’s Early Adopters

You’ll be seeing that tweet a lot over the next few days. It’s the first ever public tweet that was posted to the service we now know as Twitter. And it was sent ten years ago by Jack Dorsey, one of Twitter’s founders.

Today, Twitter has over a hundred million users, who send 340 million tweets a day (those numbers are almost certainly out of date already) but I thought it would be interesting to look back and look at Twitter’s earliest users.

Every Twitter user has a user ID. That’s an integer which uniquely identifies them to the system. This is a simple incrementing counter[1]. You can use a site like MyTwitterID to get anyone’s ID given their Twitter username. It’s worth noting that you can change your username, but your ID is fixed. When I registered a new account last week, I got an ID that was eighteen digits long. But back in 2006, IDs were far shorter. Jack’s ID, for example, is 12. That’s the lowest currently active ID on the system. I assume that the earlier numbers were used for test accounts.

Using the Twitter API you can write a program that will give you details of a user from their ID. Yesterday I wrote a simple program to get the details of the first 100,000 Twitter users (the code is available on Github). The results from running the program are online. That’s a list of all of the currently active Twitter users with an ID less than 100,000.

The first thing you’ll notice is that there are far fewer than you might expect. The API only returns details on currently active users. So anyone who has closed their account won’t be listed. I expected that perhaps 20-25% of accounts might fall into that category, but it was much higher than that.

There are 12,435 users in the file. That means that 87,500 of the first 100,000 Twitter accounts are no longer active. That was such a surprise to me that I assumed there was a bug in my program. But I can’t find one. It really looks like almost 90% of the early Twitter users are no longer using the service.

The dates that the account were created range from Jack‘s on 21st March 2006 to Jeremy Hulette (ID 99983 – the closest we have to 100,000) exactly nine months later on 21st December 2006.  I guess you could get a good visualisation of Twitter’s early growth by plotting ID against creation date – but I’ll leave that to someone else.

My file also contains location. But it’s important to note that I’m getting the location that is currently associated with that account – not the original location (I wonder if Twitter still have that information). I know a large number of people who were in London when they joined Twitter by who are now in San Francisco, so any conclusions you draw from the location field are necessarily sketchy. But bearing that in mind, here are some “firsts”.

That last one seems a little high to me. I might have missed someone earlier who didn’t put “UK” in their location.

So who’s on the list? Is there anyone famous? Not that I’ve seen yet. Oh, there are well-known geeks on the list. But no-one you’d describe as a celebrity. No musicians, no actors, no politicians, no footballers or athletes. I may have missed someone – please let me know if you spot anyone.

Oh, and I’m on the list. I’m at number 14753. I signed up (as @davorg) at 11:30 on Wednesday 22nd November 2006. I suspect I’m one of the first thousand or so Brits on the list – but it’s hard to be sure of that.

Anyway, happy birthday to Twitter. I hope that someone finds this data interesting. Let me know what you find.

[1] Actually, there’s a good chance that this is no longer the case – but it was certainly true back in 2006.

The post Twitter’s Early Adopters appeared first on Davblog.

slideshare

Writing Books (The Easy Bit)


As seen at Floss UK Spring Conference 2016. How to create ebooks from Markdown.
davblog

My Family in 1939

Here in the UK, a census has been taken almost every ten years since 1841. There were a few censuses before that, but before 1841 they only counted people – they didn’t include lists of names.

These census records are released 100 years after the date of the census and this data is of great interest to genealogists. The most recent census that we have access to is from 1911 and the one from 1921 will be released at the start of 2022.

But occasionally, other records emerge that are almost as useful as a census. For example, in September 1939, on the eve of the Second World War, the British government took a national register which was used to issue identity cards to everyone.

Last November, FindMyPast made the contents of this register available to everyone. Initially I didn’t look at it as I have a FindMyPast subscription and I was annoyed that this didn’t cover the new records. I assumed that eventually the new data would be rolled into my existing subscription, so I decided to wait.

I didn’t have to wait very long. Yesterday I got access to the records. So I settled down last night to find out what I could about my ancestors in 1939. As it turned out, it didn’t take long. There were only ten of them and they were split across four households.

george_clarke

This is most of my father’s family. You can see his parents, James and Ivy Cross. They are living with Ivy’s parents George and Lily Clarke. George worked for Greene King all of his life (for over sixty years) and this is the last job he did for them – running an off-licence in Holland-on-Sea. James and Ivy lived in the same building until James died in 1970. I remember spending a lot of time there when I was a child. I even have vague memories of George who died when I was three or four.

My father was born three months after this register was taken – in January 1940 – so it’s interesting to note that Ivy is, at this time, six months pregnant.

albert_cross

Just down the road are the rest of my father’s family – James’ parents Albert and Lily Cross living with their daughter (my great-aunt) Grace. Albert’s father (another James) was the lifeboatman who I have written about before.

robert_sowman

Looking a bit further afield, we find most of my mother’s family living in Thorpe-le-Soken. You’ll see my great-grandparents, Robert and Agnes Sowman, along with three closed records. Records are closed if the people in them are born less than 100 years ago and aren’t known to have died. The first two closed records here are my grandmother, Cecilia, and her sister Margaret. Both of these woman are no longer alive, so I should be able to get FindMyPast to open these records by sending them copies of their death certificates. The third closed record will be for Constance, the third daughter in the family.

maud_mary_turpin

And finally, here’s the final part of my family. Maud Turpin, living alone in Maldon. Maud is Agnes Sowman’s mother. Actually, this record showed me the only piece of information that I didn’t already know. Previously, I wasn’t sure when Maud’s husband Alfred died. He was still alive in the 1911 census and this record gives me strong evidence that he died before 1939. I think I’ve found a good candidate for his death record in 1931.


So that’s a pretty good summary of what you’ll find in the 1939 register. It’s a good substitute for a census (particularly as there was no census in 1941 – as the country was too busy fighting a war) and it’s nice that it’s not covered by census privacy laws, so it has been released to the public about 25 years sooner than you might expect. But, certainly in my case, I already had a lot of knowledge about my family in this period so I didn’t learn very much that was new. If I had paid the £7 per household that FindMyPast had initially asked for, I think I would have been very disappointed.

I should point out that You don’t just get this information. Each results page gives a map (actually, a selection of maps) showing where your ancestors lived. This is a nice touch. There are also random newspaper cuttings and photos from the locality. You might find these interesting – I really didn’t.

Has anyone else used these records yet? Have you found anything interesting?

p.s. And yes, if you’re paying close attention, you’ll notice that there’s one grandparent missing from my list above. Ask me about that in the pub one day.

The post My Family in 1939 appeared first on Davblog.

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2015 in Gigs

As has become traditional round these parts, it’s time for my annual review of the gigs I saw last year.

I saw 48 gigs in 2015. That’s up on 2014’s 45, but still short of my all time high of 60 in 2013. I saw Chvrches, Stealing Sheep and Paper Aeroplanes twice. I was supposed to see a couple of other artists twice, but Natalie Prass cancelled the second show and I couldn’t get to the second Soak show as I was ill.

As always, there were some disappointments. Renaissance really weren’t very good (I waited to hear “Northern Lights” and then buggered off) and Elbow weren’t as good as I’d seen them before. But the biggest disappointment this year has to be Bob Dylan. He was terrible. I left at the interval.

About half-way through the year, I stopped writing reviews on my gig site. I’ve put up posts with just the data about the shows and I hope to back-fill some of the reviews at some point, but I can’t see it happening soon. Hopefully I’ll keep the site more up to date this year.

So here (in chronological order) are my favourite gigs of the year:

Gigs that fell just outside of the top ten included Julian Cope, Suzanne Vega, Paper Aeroplanes and Smoke Fairies. Oh, and the Indie Daze Festival was great too.

I already have tickets for a dozen shows in 2016. I’m particularly looking forward to ELO in April and seeing the Cure for the first time for far too many years in December.

The post 2015 in Gigs appeared first on Davblog.

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