twitter

@armyofcaitlin I had to tell my Tivo exactly the same thing this evening.

last.fm

Kirsty MacColl – Roman Gardens

http://www.last.fm/music/Kirsty+MacColl
last.fm

Kirsty MacColl – Roman Gardens

http://www.last.fm/music/Kirsty+MacColl
last.fm

Stealing Sheep – The Garden

http://www.last.fm/music/Stealing+Sheep
last.fm

Peter Gabriel – San Jacinto (Live Version)

http://www.last.fm/music/Peter+Gabriel
last.fm

Peter Gabriel – Biko (Live Version)

http://www.last.fm/music/Peter+Gabriel
twitter

@aaroncrane No. You're right. I misread it initially. Put my reading glasses on now :-/

twitter

@aaroncrane I'll assume you meant "can't" there :-)

twitter

Eight arguments about whether the UK is a Christian country - Nice summary of the arguments over whether... http://t.co/w5Qy9XRBIw

twitter

I’m going to Peter Gabriel @ Wembley Arena. https://t.co/9C1TQymbFw

davblog

Sky Broadband

Back in October 2009, I wrote about how I had cancelled my Demon account and switched to Be Broadband. Be were the broadband provider of choice for the discerning geek. None of their customers had a bad thing to say against them. All was well with the world.

And then, just over a year ago, the sky fell in.

Or, rather, Sky brought out Telefonica’s broadband business – and Be was one of Telefonica’s broadband brands. It was terrible news. Geeks all over the UK were appalled that their favourite ISP could be owned by a company that so many of us have strong political objections too. The news got worse soon afterwards as it was announced that we would all be migrated over to Sky’s broadband network within a year.

A mass migration of geeks started. The internet was awash with discussions of the best alternatives. If Sky were watching, then I’m sure that they were rather taken aback by the reaction.

I was one of the people who was determined to leave. I spent many an hour perusing other broadband providers’ web sites – weighing pros and cons.

But a combination of lethargy and business took over and I never left.

In January I got a letter from Sky announcing that I would be migrating in the spring. They proudly announced that my new plan would be cheaper than my old Be plan – a fact that was only true because of a 12 month discount that they gave me. The letter came with a brochure explaining all the advantages of being with Sky. It also told me that my old Be router would work with my new connection.

Still, I didn’t change providers.

In March I got another letter telling that I’d be on a different plan (fibre, not ADSL) and that it would cost quite a bit more than my Be plan. There was no explanation of the change, but I didn’t object as I quite fancied a fibre connection.

Then I got more communication. An email telling me my  new IP address. And another telling me that my new Sky Hub was on its way. That’s the replacement router that they told me I didn’t need. Then another letter telling me that my broadband would be switched over on 10th April. And then the router itself arrived.

Then, last Thursday, the day of the changeover arrived. In the middle of the afternoon my Be connection was switched off. And replaced with nothing. The Sky connection wasn’t turned on. I was told that it could happen at any time up until midnight so I didn’t worry (much) until I got up the next day and still had no connection.

I needed to call them. But their support line costs 5p/minute unless you call from one of their phones. So I waited until I got to work. On the way I got a text from Sky telling me that I had missed an installation appointment. Which was weird because a) I didn’t have an appointment and b) my wife had been at home all day.

When I got to work, I called them. And sat there on hold for thirty minutes. Eventually I spoke to someone. He couldn’t explain why I hadn’t been connected or why I had been told I’d missed a phantom appointment. But he said that our only option was to book a new time with the BT Openreach engineers (the people who actually needed to do the work in the exchange). He said he would phone them and call me back with a date. He also set my expectations and said that it wouldn’t probably be before the middle of the next week.

He called back in about half an hour. He said that he had been offered a date of 28th April but that he had argued that down to the 16th. I realised that there was nothing else I could do, so I hunkered down to weather six days without an internet connection.

Today was the day that the connection was finally going to be made. I was slightly worried as my “track your order” was still showing the “we have a problem” message from last week. But I put that down to Sky’s incompetence and tried to think positive thoughts. My wife was at home and resetting the hub every couple of hours to see if it would spring into life – but to no avail.

When I got home this evening, I plugged our house phone into the Sky line and called their support number. I got through quickly and explained my problem. At first the adviser tried to convince me that it could still happen any time up to midnight, but I persuaded him to speak to the actual installation team. When he took me off hold he had some rather bad news. Somehow, the change of date from the 28th to the 16th had never been confirmed. And the installation team weren’t planning to do anything to my line for almost two weeks.

I explained again what I had been told. He spoke to the installation team again but they were adamant that my service was going to be turned on at the end of the month.

So I finally did what I should have done a year ago. I cancelled the contract. Well, I asked to. He put me through to a colleague in what I assume was customer retention. I explained the whole sorry tale again. He asked for half an hour to try and salvage the situation, which I agreed to. But when he called back, he said that he could do nothing to fix things. So the contract was cancelled.

All of which leaves me with no internet provider. And a long weekend coming up. I might need to leave the house. Or I might just buy a Y800.

But it’s all very disappointing. Some fundamental mistakes have been made. What Sky don’t seem to realise is that Be customers are used to a company that routinely exceeds customers’ expectations. Sky seem content to fall well short of them. There are three areas in particular where I think Sky fell down.

So. What ISPs should I be looking at. I’m considering Virgin Media, because I already get my phone and TV through them. The broadband is a separate account (paid for by my company) but VM say I can get what sounds like a pretty good connection from them for only £2 a month more than I’m currently paying them.

But I’m open to alternative suggestions.

The post Sky Broadband appeared first on Davblog.

github

davorg commented on issue blogs-perl-org/blogs.perl.org#268

Dave Cross

This is annoying. The list of login providers is held on a per-blog basis. There doesn't seem to be any way to turn a particular provider off globa…

books read

Speaking JavaScript

Speaking JavaScript
author: Axel Rauschmayer
name: David
average rating: 0.0
book published: 2014
rating: 0
read at:
date added: 2014/04/13
shelves: currently-reading
review:

davblog

Macs and Me

“It never stops raining!” ranted the lorry driver. He thumped the table, spilt his tea, and actually, for a moment, appeared to be steaming.
You can’t just walk off without responding to a remark like that.
Of course it stops raining,” said Arthur. It was hardly an elegant refutation, but it had to be said.
“It rains … all … the time,” raved the man, thumping the table again, in time to the words.
Arthur shook his head.
“Stupid to say it rains all the time …” he said.
The man’s eyebrows shot up, affronted.
“Stupid? Why’s it stupid? Why’s it stupid to say it rains all the time if it rains the whole time?”
“Didn’t rain yesterday.”
“Did in Darlington.”
Arthur paused, warily.
“You going to ask me where I was yesterday?” asked the man. “Eh?”
“No,” said Arthur.
“But I expect you can guess.”
“Do you.”
“Begins with a D.”
“Does it.”
“And it was pissing down there, I can tell you.”

- So Long And Thanks For All The Fish (Douglas Adams)

When I try to explain my experience of Apple hardware to people, I’m always aware that I end up sounding like Douglas Adams’ Rain God. My Mac hardware always breaks down in some interesting and unpredictable way. People tell me that I’m exaggerating, it can’t be true that it always breaks down. But I’m not; it does.

To be precise here, every piece of Mac kit that I have ever owned has been replaced because it has stopped working in some way. This is in contrast to the large number of non-Apple laptops and desktop PCs that I have owned over the same period of time. They have all been replaced, while in good working order, because I’ve suddenly realised that I’ve owned them for a long time and there’s probably a newer, better model out there.

I’m not exaggerating here at all. It happens every time. Every. Single. Time.

I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but here’s what I remember.

But I suspect that this Macbook is on its way out. Which means buying a replacement. And that’s always so depressing. Mac hardware is always so much more expensive than the equivalent non-Mac system. And it never works properly (at least in my experience).

I’ve started browsing the Apple web site. And I see that they’ve stopped making the Macbook. It’ll need to be a Macbook Air. Which means it’ll be even more expensive and, astonishingly, less functional – they don’t have a CD/DVD drive.

I know what you’re thinking? If I have such a hard time with Mac systems, then why do I still buy them. It’s not for me. My wife likes them more than Windows systems. But I think that this time we might need to have a Serious Talk about what we’re going to buy.

The post Macs and Me appeared first on Davblog.

perl hacks

Installing Modules

If you’ve seen me giving my “Kingdom of the Blind” lightning talk this year, then you’ll know that I’ve been hanging around places like the LinkedIn Perl groups and StackOverflow trying to help people get the most out of Perl. It can be an “interesting” experience.

One of the most frequent questions I see is some variant of “I have found this program, but when I try to run it I get an error saying it can’t find this module”. Of course, the solution to this is simple. You tell them to install the missing module. But, as always, the devil is in the detail and I think that in many cases the answers I seen could be improved.

Most people seem to leap in and suggest that the original poster should install the module using cpan (advanced students might suggest cpanminus instead). These are, of course, great tools. But I don’t think this is the best answer in to these questions.

In most cases, the people asking questions are new to Perl. In some cases they don’t even want to learn any Perl – they just want to use a useful program that happens to be written in Perl. I think that launching these people into the CPAN ecosystem is a bad idea. Yes, eventually, it would be good to get them using perlbrew, local::lib and cpanminus. But one step at a time. First let’s show them how easy it can be to use Perl.

In many of these cases, I think that the best approach is to suggest that they use their native package manager to install a pre-packaged version of the required module.

Yes, I know the system Perl is evil and outdated. Yes, I know that they probably won’t get the latest and greatest version of your CPAN module from apt-get or yum.  And, yes, I know there’s a chance that the required module won’t be available from the package repositories. But I still think it’s worth giving it a try. Because in most cases the module will be  there and available as a recent enough version that it will solve their immediate problem and let them get on with their work.

There are three main reasons for this suggestion:

  1. People in this situation will almost certainly be using the system Perl anyway. And the  system Perl will already have pre-packaged modules installed alongside it. And installing modules using cpanminus alongside pre-packaged modules in the same library installation is a recipe for disaster. The package manager no longer knows what’s installed or what versions are installed and hilarity ensues.
  2. The pre-packaged versions will know about non-Perl requirements for the CPAN module and will pull those in as well as other required CPAN modules. One of the most common requests I see is for GD or one of its related modules. Your package manager will know about the underlying requirement for  libgd. cpanminus and friends probably won’t.
  3. The user is more likely to be used to using their package manager. Teaching them about the CPAN ecosystem can come later. Let’s ease them into using Perl by starting them off with tools that they are familiar with.

I know that both Fedora/Centos/RHEL and Ubuntu/Debian have large numbers of CPAN modules already pre-packaged for easy installation. Let’s suggest that people make use of this work to get up and running with Perl quickly. Later on we can show the the power and flexibility that comes with using the Perl-specific tools.

Of course there’s then a debate about when (and how) we start to wean these people off of the system Perl and pre-build packages and on to perlbrew/cpanminus/etc. But I think that having a community of people who are used to using CPAN modules (albeit in this slightly restricted manner) is an improvement on the current situation where people often avoid CPAN completely because module installation is seen as too difficult.

What do you think? Are there obvious errors in my thinking?

The post Installing Modules appeared first on Perl Hacks.

github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/filmical

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/cookingvinyl

Dave Cross
  • Dave Cross 3585051
    Moved files into subdirectories. Tweaked buildsite to handle that.
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/cookingvinyl

Dave Cross
github

davorg pushed to master at davorg/cookingvinyl

Dave Cross
flickr

DSC_0097

Dave Cross posted a photo:

DSC_0097

flickr

DSC_0096

Dave Cross posted a photo:

DSC_0096

flickr

DSC_0095

Dave Cross posted a photo:

DSC_0095

flickr

DSC_0094

Dave Cross posted a photo:

DSC_0094

flickr

DSC_0093

Dave Cross posted a photo:

DSC_0093

davblog

Year of Code on Newsnight

You’ve probably already seen the section on the government’s Year of Code initiative that was on Newsnight last Wednesday. But, in case you haven’t, here is it. We’ll wait while you catch up.

Most of the commentary I’ve seen on this concentrates on Lottie Dexter’s performance in the interview that takes up the second half of the clip. We’ll get to her later on, but the problems start long before she appears on screen. Within the first couple of minutes of the report, reporter Zoe Conway has referred to code as “baffling computer commands” and “gobbledigook”. One lesson that I’ve learned as a trainer is that a sure-fire way to ensure that students don’t understand what you’re about to teach them is to describe it as difficult or complex, so Conway’s descriptions of programming languages are hardly going to encourage people to take up programming. As Conway says “baffling computer commands”, here’s the code that appears on  the screen:

if (distance < radius) {

} else {

} // END if statement

Perhaps the fact that I’ve been programming for thirty years is clouding my judgment here, but I really don’t think that this code is “baffling”. Lily Cole does her best to counter this misinformation – saying that it’s “really cool to see how quickly we can pick it up”. I hope people listen to her and not the (obviously out of her depth) reporter. We then move on to the idea of children being taught to program at school. Various people tell us how important it is and we see a class who are trialing the programming syllabus that will be rolled out nationwide this autumn. Conway then gets to the heart of the issue. She visits East London’s “Tech City” and explains the severe shortage of programmers that the companies there are experiencing. There simply isn’t the supplier of programmers that the UK’s tech industry needs. Anything that addresses that problem should be welcomed. And then we’re back in the studio where Jeremy Paxman is talking to the Year of Code initiative’s director, Lottie Dexter. This is when it gets really weird. Let’s get a couple of things straight. I don’t think it’s a problem that Lottie Dexter isn’t a programmer. She didn’t try to hide that. She was clear about it right from the start. I also think that it’s great that she want to be a guinea pig for the Year of Code by saying that she wants to learn to code over the next year. But I do think that it’s a real shame that before coming to the interview she couldn’t find someone in her organisation[1] who could spend an hour briefing her so that she could sound like she knew what she was talking about. Instead, she just made the whole initiative look bad. Let’s look at some of the things she said.

Paxman wasn’t much help either. I know he has a rather adversarial approach to interviewing, but was it really necessary to be quite so sneering about the whole idea? He did ask one good question though. He asked why it was necessary to code. And he’s right, of course, no-one absolutely needs to know how to code. But I think there are three reasons why teaching everyone to code is a good idea:

  1. We don’t know who is going to be good at programming. So teaching it to every child seems to be a good way of making sure as many people as possible get to try it.
  2. Even if many children don’t take up programming full-time, the fact they have been exposed to it demystifies it. They will be less likely to see it as a “black art” and will have more idea of what is possible.
  3. People who have some programming experience will be at an advantage over people who don’t. The future is going to be about data manipulation – extracting useful information from reams of data. See, for example, the Hacks and Hackers group.

So, yes, of course I agree with the idea of teaching children to code. The UK is already desperately short of programmers and that demand is only going to continue growing. But I worry slightly that the Year of Code project is just about being seen to do something rather than working out what the best thing to do it. The government have a awesome IT department doing wonderful things. I wonder what input they have had into this process. And please, can someone spend an hour or so explaining the basics of programming to Lottie Dexter before she makes her next TV appearance.

Update: Emma Mulqueeny has been working in this area for many years with her Young Rewired State project. Her reaction to the Year of Code is very interesting.

[1] Although, Tom Morris has severe doubts about the amount of technical know-how within the organisation.

The post Year of Code on Newsnight appeared first on Davblog.

perl hacks

The Return of blogs.perl.org

About an hour ago we turned blogs.perl.org back on. There’s also a blog post where we explain what happened in a lot more detail.

If you have an account on the site then you will have received an email explaining what you need to do now. Basically, we’ve invalidated all of the passwords so you’ll need to ask the system for a new one.

Sorry again for the inconvenience. And huge thanks to the rest of the blogs.perl.org team (particularly Aaron Crane) for fixing this.

The post The Return of blogs.perl.org appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

blogs.perl.org

It seems that last night blogs.perl.org was hacked. I first became aware of it when someone pointed me at this story a few hours ago. As you’ll see, the contents of the mt_author table have been made public.

We’re still investigating the extent of the hack. But, as a precaution, we have configured the site so that all dynamic pages return a 404 response. This will, unfortunately, prevent you from logging on to the site.

We will publish more information when we have it.

Apologies for the inconvenience.

Update:

Update 2:
Here’s a cut-down version of the published data that includes only the name columns. Hopefully you can use this to work out whether or not you have an account on the system.

The post blogs.perl.org appeared first on Perl Hacks.

perl hacks

Dots and Perl

I was running a training course this week, and a conversation I had with the class reminded me that I have been planning to write this article for many months.

There are a number of operators in Perl that are made up of nothing but dots. How many of them can you name?

There are actually five dot operators in Perl. If the people on my training courses are any guide, most Perl programmers can only name two or three of them. Here’s a list. It’s in approximate order of how well-known I think the operators are (which is, coincidentally, also the order of increasing length).

One Dot

Everyone knows the one dot operator, right? It’s the concatenation operator. It converts its two operands to strings and concatenates them.

# $string contains 'one stringanother string'
my $string = 'one string' . 'another string';

It’s also sometimes useful to use it to force scalar context onto an expression. Consider the difference between these two statements.

say "Time: ", localtime;
say "Time: " . localtime;

The difference between the two statements is tiny, but the output is very different.

There’s not much more to say about the single dot.

Two Dots

Things start to get a little more interesting when we look at two dots. The two dot operator is actually two different operators depending on how it is used. Most people know that it can be used to generate a range of values.

my @numbers = (1 .. 100);
my @letters = ('a' .. 'z');

You can also use it in something like a for loop. This is an easy way to execute an operation a number of times.

do_something() for 1 .. 3;

In older versions of Perl, this could potentially eat up a lot of memory as a temporary array was created to contain the range and therefore something like

do_something() for 1 .. 1000000;

could be a problem. But in all modern versions of Perl, that temporary array is not created and the expression causes no problems.

Two dots acts as a range operator when it is used in list context. In scalar context, its behaviour is different. It becomes a different operator – the flip-flop operator.

The flip-flop operator is so-called because it flip-flops between two states. It starts as returning false and continues to do so until something “flips” it into its true state. It then continues to return true until something else “flops” it back into a false state. The cycle then repeats.

So what causes it to flip-flop between its two states? It’s the evaluation of its left and right operands. Imagine you are processing a file that contains text that you are interested in and other text that you can ignore. The start of a block that you want to process is marked with a line containing “START” and the end of the block is marked with “END”. Between and “END” marker and the next “START”, there can be lots of text that you want to ignore.

A naive way to process this would involve some kind of “process this” flag.

my $process_this = 0;
while (<$file>) {
  $process_this = 1 if /START/;
  $process_this = 0 if /END/;
  process_this_line($_) if $process_this;
}

I’ve often seen code that looks like this. The author of that code didn’t know about the flip-flop operator. The flip-flop operator encapsulates all of that logic for you. Using the flip-flop operator, the previous code becomes this:

while (<$file>) {
  process_this_line($_) if /START/ .. /END/;
}

The flip-flop operator returns false until its left operand (/START/) evaluates as true. It then returns true until its right operand (/END/) evaluates as true. And then the cycle repeats.

The flip-flop operator has one more trick up its sleeve. One common requirement is to only process certain line numbers in a file (perhaps we just want to process lines 20 to 40). If one of the operands is a constant number, then it is compared the the current record number (in $.) and the operand is fired if the line number matches. So processing lines 20 to 40 of a file is a simple as:

while (<$file>) {
  process_this_line($_) if 20 .. 40;
}

Three Dots

It was the three dot operator that triggered the conversation which reminded me to write this article. A three dot operator was added in Perl 5.12. It’s called the “yada-yada” operator. It is used to stand for unimplemented code.

sub reverse_polarity {
  # TODO: Must write this
  ...
}

Programmers have been leaving “TODO” comments in their code for decades. And they’ve been using ellipsis (a.k.a. three dots) to signify unimplemented code for just as long. But now you can actually put three dots in your source code and it will compile and run. So what’s the benefit of this over just leaving a TODO comment? Well, what happens if you call a function that just contains a comment? The function executes and does nothing. You might not realise that you haven’t implemented that function yet. With the yada-yada operator standing in for the unimplemented code, Perl throws an “unimplemented” error and you are reminded that you need to write that code before calling it.

But the yada-yada operator wasn’t the first three dot operator in Perl. There has been another one in the language for a very long time (you might say since the year dot!) And I bet very few of you know what it is.

The original three dot operator is another flip-flop operator. And the difference between it and the two dot version is subtle. It’s all to do with how many tests can be run against the same line. With the two dot version, when the operator flips to true it also checks the right-hand operand in the same iteration – meaning that it can flip from false to true and back to false again as part of the same iteration. If you use the three dot version, then once the operator flips to true, then it won’t check the right-hand operand until the next iteration – meaning that the operator can only flip once per iteration.

When does this matter? Well if our text file sometimes contains empty records that contain START and END on the same line, the difference between the two and three dot flip-flops will determine exactly which lines are processed.

If the two dot version encounters one of these empty records, it flips to true (because it matches /START/) and then flops back to false (because it matches (/END/). However, the flop to false doesn’t happen until after the expression returns a value (which is true). The net effect, therefore is that the line is printed, but the flip-flop is left in the false state and the following lines won’t be printed until one contains a START.

If the three dot version encounters one of these empty records, it also flips to true (because it matches /START/) but then doesn’t check the right-hand operand. So the line gets printed and the flip-flop remains in its true state so the following lines will continue to be printed until one contains an end.

Which is correct? Well, of course, it depends on your requirements. In this case, I expect that the two dot version gives the results that most people would expect. But the three dot version is also provided for the cases when its behaviour is required. As always, Perl gives you the flexibility to do exactly what you want.

But I suspect that the relatively small number of people who seem to know about the three dot flip-flip would indicate that its behaviour isn’t needed very often.

So, there you have them. Perl’s five dot operators – concatenation, range, flip-flop, yada-yada and another flip-flop. I hope that helps you impress people in your next Perl job interview.

Update: dakkar points out that yada-yada isn’t actually an operator. He’s absolutely right, of course, it stands in place of a statement and has no operands. But being slightly loose with our terminology here makes for a more succinct article.

The post Dots and Perl appeared first on Perl Hacks.

davblog

UK Film Releases

I like watching films. I’ve been a member of the Clapham Picturehouse for about ten years and I like to get there a few times a month.

But I’m not very organised in my cinema-going. I never really seem to have much of an idea about what films are being released in the coming weeks. This means that sometimes I get taken by surprise when three or four films I want to see all open in the same week.

So I decided that if I had a better view of what is coming up, then I’d be better able to plan my visits. And that sent me looking for an iCal feed of upcoming UK film releases. But I was surprised to find that no such thing existed. Or, at least, if it did, it was very well hidden. I found a couple of RSS feeds on filmdates.co.uk, but they omitted the most important information – the date the film was going to be released.

After an unproductive couple of hours trying to track down an existing feed, I decided that I was just going to have to build one myself. So that’s what I did.

The iCal feed itself is at http://dave.org.uk/ukfilmrel.ics and I’ve also built a page that presents the information in a more easy to understand format. Currently, the data comes from a text file that I created by hand from just going through the latest copy of Empire. Hopefully I’ll find a better source for this information at some point in the future.

I thought it would be a two-hour job. But (as is usually the way) it took a bit longer than that and I ended up having to learn rather more about iCal than I thought I would. If you’re interested, you can find the code on Github.

If you find it useful, please let me know.

The post UK Film Releases appeared first on Davblog.

perl hacks

Perl APIs

For a lot of programmers out there, Perl has become largely invisible. They just never come across it. That might seem strange to you as you sit inside the Perl community echo chamber reading the Perl Ironman or p5p, but try this simple experiment.

Think of a web site that you use and that supplies an API. Now go to that API’s documentation and look at the example code. What languages are the examples written in? PHP? Almost certainly. Ruby? Probably. Python? Probably. C#? Quite possibly. Perl? Almost certainly not[1].

Perl has fallen so far off the radar of most people that when web sites write example code for these APIs, they very rarely consider Perl as a language worth including. And because they don’t bother including Perl then any random programmer coming to that API will assume that the API doesn’t support Perl, or (at the very least) that the lack of examples will make using Perl harder than it would be with plenty of examples to copy from.

This then becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy as Github fills with more and more projects using other languages to talk to these APIs. And the chance of anyone who isn’t already a Perl user ever trying to interact with these APIs using Perl falls and falls.

Of course, this is all completely wrong. These APIs are just going to be a series of HTTP requests using REST or XML-RPC (or, if you’re really unlucky, SOAP). Perl has good support for all of that. You might need to use something like OAuth to get access to the API – well Perl does that too.

Of course, in some cases good Perl support exists already – Net::Twitter is a good example. And to be fair to Twitter, their API documentation doesn’t seem to give any examples in specific languages – so Perl isn’t excluded here. But in many other cases, the Perl version languishes unnoticed on CPAN while other languages get mentioned on the API page.

I think that we can try to address this in 2014. And I’d like to ask you to help me. I’ve set up a mailing list called perl-api-squad where we can discuss this. In a nutshell, I think that the plan should be something like this:

  1. Identify useful APIs where there is either no Perl API or no Perl examples
  2. Write CPAN API wrappers where they are missing
  3. Approve API owners and offer them Perl examples to add to their web site

That doesn’t sound too complicated to me. And I think (or, perhaps, hope) that most API owners will be grateful to add more examples of API usage to their site – particularly if it involves next to no effort on their part.

I also expect that the Perl API Squad will produce a web site that lists Perl API support. We might even move towards producing a framework that makes it easy to write a basic Perl wrapper around any new API.

What do you think? Is this a worthwhile project? Who’s interested in joining in?

[1] Yes, I know there are exceptions. But they are just that – exceptions.

The post Perl APIs appeared first on Perl Hacks.

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